Shrouds

Following on from an earlier post, the layered, wrapped and weighted shrouds were left for a couple of weeks to allow the eucalyptus leaves to imprint the fabric as much as possible.

Shroud

The fabrics were then unwrapped, hung out to dry and pressed with a warm steam iron.  Here are a some images of the finished shrouds. Continue reading Shrouds

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Dyeing with eucalyptus leaves Part 6

Leaf Imprinting

The following is the method I use for imprinting leaves onto fabric and works most successfully on silk organza.  It works well on a variety of leaves except for very thick eucalyptus leaves. Continue reading Dyeing with eucalyptus leaves Part 6

Dyeing with eucalyptus leaves Part 5

Solar dyeing

This is probably the most environmentally friendly form of dyeing with Eucalyptus leaves.  All you need is a glass container with a screw top lid, leaves and water.  Solar dyeing works best in summer when the sunlight is strong, but good results can be achieved in winter if the jar is kept in a sunny place for longer. Continue reading Dyeing with eucalyptus leaves Part 5

Dyeing with eucalyptus leaves Part 4

Simmer Dyeing Part 2

Most eucalyptus leaves will yield a range of golden-brown to red-brown colours without using any additional mordant.  As mentioned in a previous article, the colours are fast in protein fibres such as wool and silk. To extend the colour range, different mordants in the form of additives or containers, or both, can be used.

Here are the results of my experimentation to date, all use the simmer dye technique: Continue reading Dyeing with eucalyptus leaves Part 4

Dyeing with eucalyptus leaves Part 3

Simmer Dyeing Part 1

To begin simmer dyeing, first collect the following containers from Op shops or second-hand stores (DON’T use dye containers for cooking):  Enamel/enamel coated or stainless steel, tin and cast iron.  I use a cast iron saucepan by Michael Lax for Copco (NOT enamel coated).  The range is no longer produced but sometimes comes up for sale at second-hand or antique stores or on Ebay. Continue reading Dyeing with eucalyptus leaves Part 3