Where to next [fashion, Part Three]

As mentioned previously, the future of fashion has to be based on sustainability or it isn’t relevant.  The same applies to any industry.  So what options are available for sustainable fashion?  The materials are the main concern, followed by ethical production.

Sex Pistols T-shirt, designed by Vivienne Westwood and Jamie Reid, customised by Johnny Rotten, late 1970s. Museum no. S.794-1990
Sex Pistols T-shirt, designed by Vivienne Westwood and Jamie Reid, customised by Johnny Rotten, late 1970s. V & A Museum no. S.794-1990

Sustainable materials include natural such as organic cotton, hemp, bamboo, silk, linen, wool, etc;  recycled plastic based fabrics; reconstituted fabrics from broken down natural and synthetic materials and reconstructed; whole clothing or factory off cuts or seconds that are surplus or returned; used fabric or clothing that is wearable; used clothing that is falling apart or unwearable due to broken zips, holes, stains, etc.

Viktor & Rolf Fall 2016 Haute Couture Vagabond Collection. Made from clothing and fabrics from previous collections.
Viktor & Rolf Fall 2016 Haute Couture Vagabond Collection. Made from clothing and fabrics from previous collections.

Ethical production follows the trail from fabric production to the finished item of clothing, and can account for every step of the way.  This depends on transparency.  Some of the good fabric suppliers such as Pickering International or Elsegood Fabrics, are happy to assist with information.

Cut and construction can be difficult to follow with contracting and subcontracting if the process isn’t documented.  Choices for local production in Australia are limited, so can be competitive to book in, and also require scrutiny for award wages and working conditions at all levels of production.

Deconstructed and redesigned rain mackintosh by Junky Styling, 2009
Deconstructed and redesigned rain mackintosh by Junky Styling, 2009

Ideally learning how to do everything is the easiest path to ethical production, or team up with people who have complimentary skills.  Digital design through Spoonflower; learning skills in painting, dyeing and printing fabric via Kraftkolour or Dharma Trading; using hand or machine fabric manipulation techniques to customise or create fabric.  Few of my favourite designers trained in fashion design, so lack of orthodox skills leads to new ways of creating, proving great fashion is about art and imagination.

Comme des Garçons Spring 2013, clothing made from what looks like multiple toile pieces
Comme des Garçons Spring 2013, clothing made from what looks like multiple toile pieces.  Headwear by Graham Hudson, made of recycled and upcycled materials and items.

 

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Eucalypso

Artist in Adelaide, South Australia. I enjoy viewing and participating in street art and experimenting with photography for surface design.

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